Get It While It’s Free!

“Dragon’s Rook by Keanan Brand is an amazing read. It features an intricately detailed, original world, showcasing a classic struggle between good and evil.” (Amazon reviewer)

The Lost Sword duology is an epic fantasy in two parts: Dragon’s Rook (2015) and Dragon’s Bane (2016 or TBA). Dragon’s Rook introduces Captain Gaerbith, a shepherd turned soldier, and Kieran Smith, an orphan raised by a blacksmith. They do not yet know one another, but their destinies are interconnected. Before the end of the second book, they will join forces to find the lost sword, end a war, and fulfill ancient prophecies — but not, perhaps, as the ancients expected.

Many others join them on their journeys: friends, enemies, kindred, friends as close as kin, and enemies who may become allies. Gaerbith becomes betrothed to a high-born lady, and Kieran loves a mysterious healer with a crippled hand.

And there are Dragons, who — like the others — have secrets of their own.

The e-book version of Dragon’s Rook is available for free on Smashwords for another two weeks (coupon code: XM56N). There is a menu of format options available.

Writerly request: If you download the book, please be gracious and do an author a favor — leave a review on Amazon, Goodreads,Smashwords, Barnes & Noble, Shelfari, or any other book website of your choice.

Note: If you’d prefer the paperback, it is $19.99 on Amazon. 

FYI, the awesome dragon eye was drawn by Suzan Troutt. Find her at Jade’s Journal or at Gothic Tones (store, blog).

Happy Reading!

cover art by Suzan Troutt (c2014)
cover art by Suzan Troutt (c2014)
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Author v. Editor

In response to a request for suggested topics to be included in a book, a conversation thread started in a group on Facebook as writers and editors weighed in with advice about the author/editor working relationship.

KB“Patience, grasshopper!” Many writers I’ve worked with are first-time authors, and they’re unfamiliar with the process, the back-and-forth of revising, of how long that process can be and how many times a book may need to be proofed, edited for content, re-read from the beginning, etc. They don’t set the book aside for a time and gain a new perspective before working on it again. Rather, no matter my advice or encouragement to wait and do the hard work, they become frustrated and anxious, and often send off their book to publishers or they self-publish long before their work is ready.

EAPWhen working with a publisher’s editor, first thing the author should determine (and this is mostly based on feeling) whether the editor/publisher is receptive to ANY form of author’s input and/or objections. If not — well, there’s only two choices for the author: withdraw you book (often not possible) or go with everything the editor wants. If the author feels strongly he/she will not be able to work with the editor, he/she can ask the publisher for book-contract cancellation…

If, however, you are assigned an editor who is ‘willing’ to discuss your (author’s) objections, then you need to choose – and choose wisely here I say – which things you’re going to quibble over… Pick your battles…Then make a case for why you want to keep what the editor wants you to change or delete. 

While most of the editors profess to be working from the Chicago Manual of Style nothing could be further from truth. I’ve yet to meet two editors who agree on placement of commas. So, whatever small punctuation changes the editor wants, go with it… After all is said and done, do the professional thing and thank the editor for all his/her hard work and then do some soul-searching. Do you want to remain with this publisher or find another one or go solo? It’s actually a good place to be.

KBWhen I was an editor with a publisher, I was the tough guy who had to tell authors to make significant changes — not because I was trying to make over their work in my image, not because their work was terrible, but because they were writing historical fiction and therefore needed to be true to the eras. One concerned the settling of the American West, and was crammed full of cliched characters and events that were more Hollywood than history. The other book was set in Israel during the occupation by the Roman Empire, and the author tried to turn Herod into a more personable guy than he really was.

So good editors will tell their authors the hard truths, even if those authors cry to me on the phone and later complain to the publisher, as the above two authors did. The first author backed out of her contract, because — in her words — her book was perfect as it was. The second author was going through other stresses in her life that added to her resistance to change, and she cried often, but she eventually made the changes because (I hope) she saw that I had only her best in mind.

I wanted more from these authors than they were willing to give. That, I think, is often a source of contention. The author’s vision (what he thinks he’s written) can be radically different from what the editor actually sees on the page. Therefore, in the author’s mind, the editor is just obtuse and irrational, and in the editor’s mind, the author needs to knuckle down and get it right. Somewhere between them, they can hammer out a pretty darn good novel.

PEHThe manuscript is like the author’s child, and the editor is like a teacher. The same way a teacher improves upon a student by giving him or her knowledge is how an editor works with the manuscript. The teacher is just making that student better.

Questions, suggestions, advice? Continue the conversation in the comments below!